Not A Member Yet? See All The Features Of The Forum By Clicking Here To Register For FREE! Or Members Login Below:

Cyprus Eastern Forum Index Cyprus Eastern Forum Index
Offering Free Help, Advice, Tips & Support for those buying or living in:
Paralimni - Protaras - Pernera - Kapparis - Agia Napa - Larnaca - Oroklini - Pervolia - Kiti - Xylofagou
Vrysoulles - Frenaros - Dherynia - Sotira - Agia Thekla - Liopetri - Ormidia & surrounding areas...

 
Main Homepage Cyprus Eastern Forum Index Register Directory Memberlist Search

  Ads By Forum Sponsors

    
Cyprus Eastern Forum Index » General » Are Property Developers breaking E.U. Law
Post new topic  Reply to topic   View previous topic : View next topic 
Are Property Developers breaking E.U. Law 
Post: #1   PostPosted: Mon Sep 27, 2010 6:57 pm Reply with quote
Elizavet
Joined: 16 Jul 2005
Posts: 4849
Pictures: 6

 
Is this the first glimmer of hope on the horizon.


From Nigels site,

Links only visible to Registered Members
Register for Free or Login to the forum.

_________________
Elizavet
Personal Photo Album View user's profile Send e-mail Cyprus News,Weather & Travel


Hide These Ads? Register for Free or Login

 
Post: #2   PostPosted: Mon Sep 27, 2010 7:21 pm Reply with quote
PepsiCan
Joined: 15 Feb 2009
Posts: 1090
Pictures: 0
Location: Larnaka

 
Not quite but close.

The issue is that EU law as such does not exist. What the EU does is issue directives. These directives contain guidelines and minimum requirements as well as in some cases, exceptions for member states (such as Brittain's opt-out of the social welfare directoves), based on which national governments can then formulate the local law.

As you can see from the directive, it was adopted by the European parlement and subsequently approved by the council of ministers in 2005. The question now becomes:
- when is the deadline for this to be implemented at the national level?
- has Cyprus already implemented this or is there an exemption?
- is, what has been implemented, been done retrospectively? If not, it does not apply to any purchases predate when the law was enacted.

So, these questions need to be answered first before we truly see the light (or we find out the light is a train storming our way).
Personal Photo Album View user's profile Send e-mail Cyprus News,Weather & Travel
 
Post: #3   PostPosted: Tue Sep 28, 2010 12:19 am Reply with quote
Andrew Brooks
Joined: 15 Nov 2007
Posts: 2734
Pictures: 0
Location: Larnaca

 
PepsiCan wrote:
Not quite but close.

The issue is that EU law as such does not exist. What the EU does is issue directives. These directives contain guidelines and minimum requirements as well as in some cases, exceptions for member states (such as Brittain's opt-out of the social welfare directoves), based on which national governments can then formulate the local law.

As you can see from the directive, it was adopted by the European parlement and subsequently approved by the council of ministers in 2005. The question now becomes:
- when is the deadline for this to be implemented at the national level?
- has Cyprus already implemented this or is there an exemption?
- is, what has been implemented, been done retrospectively? If not, it does not apply to any purchases predate when the law was enacted.

So, these questions need to be answered first before we truly see the light (or we find out the light is a train storming our way).


Trains ?
Personal Photo Album View user's profile Send e-mail Cyprus News,Weather & Travel
 
Post: #4   PostPosted: Tue Sep 28, 2010 7:10 am Reply with quote
PepsiCan
Joined: 15 Feb 2009
Posts: 1090
Pictures: 0
Location: Larnaka

 
Yes, the proverbial light at the end of the tunnel? It could be daylight, it could be an oncoming train.
Personal Photo Album View user's profile Send e-mail Cyprus News,Weather & Travel
light at the end of the tunnel 
Post: #5   PostPosted: Tue Sep 28, 2010 7:46 am Reply with quote
weeksy9
Joined: 09 May 2006
Posts: 19
Pictures: 0
Location: london

 
Morning all!

Just got an email from my lawyer Stelios in Nicosia and hes told me that the directive HAS been impelemented in Cyprus with the law 103(1)/2007 enacted in 2007. The directive should exist in the English language on the E.U web site. The law is there to protect consumers, but its best IMHO to run a thorough investigation before you sign your contract cause in this way its bound to prevent hardship and heartache in the longrun.

BTW anyone know when I should prune a lemon tree??

Cheers

Weeksy

_________________
hiya all!
Personal Photo Album View user's profile Cyprus News,Weather & Travel
 
Post: #6   PostPosted: Tue Sep 28, 2010 9:45 am Reply with quote
Tangutica
Joined: 11 Jul 2008
Posts: 11931
Pictures: 26

 
Rest assured it won't be a train if you live in Cyprus!
Personal Photo Album View user's profile Cyprus News,Weather & Travel
 
Post: #7   PostPosted: Tue Sep 28, 2010 11:05 am Reply with quote
cansweet
Joined: 22 Sep 2009
Posts: 2053
Pictures: 1
Location: cuckoo land

 
weeksy,
if you google "lemon tree pruning" a vast amount of information will come up.
Personal Photo Album View user's profile Send e-mail Cyprus News,Weather & Travel
 
Post: #8   PostPosted: Tue Sep 28, 2010 11:12 am Reply with quote
PepsiCan
Joined: 15 Feb 2009
Posts: 1090
Pictures: 0
Location: Larnaka

 
Tangutica wrote:
Rest assured it won't be a train if you live in Cyprus!
Did you know that there was a train network in Cyprus that was disbanded around WW1? The main line ran from the north east to the south west. You can get a book on it at the Academic & General bookstore in Larnaka.
Personal Photo Album View user's profile Send e-mail Cyprus News,Weather & Travel


Hide These Ads? Register for Free or Login

 
Post: #9   PostPosted: Tue Sep 28, 2010 11:32 am Reply with quote
spurs
Membership Closed
Joined: 24 Jan 2009
Posts: 6764
Pictures: 0

 
PepsiCan wrote:
Tangutica wrote:
Rest assured it won't be a train if you live in Cyprus!
Did you know that there was a train network in Cyprus that was disbanded around WW1? The main line ran from the north east to the south west. You can get a book on it at the Academic & General bookstore in Larnaka.
.......No trains run in Cyprus today; the only forms of transport are now via road, sea or by air: buses, taxis, boats and cruise vessels. But a long time ago there was another form of transport that was spread across all of Cyprus: the magnificent triumph of engineering that was the Cyprus Government Railway (CGR).

The CGR was a 2ft 6in-gauge line with a total of 78 miles, The construction of the line's first 37 miles began in April 1904 it was from Famagusta to Nicosia and opened in October the following year, the journey from Famagusta to Nicosia took about two hours. In December 1907 the line was extended to Morphou which was 27 miles west of Nicosia. Eight years later in June it was extended by 14 miles to Evrykhou, and thus the main line was completed.

It ran for almost 50 years from October 1905 to December 1951, with a total of 39 stations, the most notable at Famagusta, Prastio Mesaoria, Angastina, Trachoni, Nicosia, Kokkinotrimithia, Morphou, Kalo Chorio and Evrychou. The names were written in three languages English, Greek, and Turkish. The average speed of the trains ranged from 20 to 30 mph and two trains would leave per day.

The CGR trains were used in various ways by both authorities and the local population. It was used as a freight transfer system which served from the port of Famagusta. It transferred timber from the Troodos mountain to towns and cities all over Cyprus. It carried freight, ore and minerals on behalf of the Cyprus Mines Corporation. Some stations also operated as telephone centres, telegram offices and postal offices which meant that some of the railway stations acted as a place where you could exchange goods.

The CGR closed down because of financial reasons, the line never made a profit and by 1932 the western end of line was shortened by three stops. While from 1948 Nicosia was the final western stop which meant ten more stations were closed. This also wasn't helped by the new 6 ton diesel lorries which appear which the CGR couldn't compete against. As the railway system, engine and tracks were over 40 years old and it wasn't easy to upgrade each compared to their road bound equivalents.

The last train to ever run left was the engine no.1 which left from Nicosia station at 14:57 on the 31st December 1951 and arrived at Famagusta at 16:38. When it finished its journey it was lifted to its final resting place by army engineers from Dhekelia by a 20 ton crane. The dismantlement after the final run lasted for over two years and 10 locomotives, the tracks and other various items were sold to the company Meyer Newman & Co, amounting up to 65,626. The Locomotive 1 train is still in its resting place in Polat PaYa Boulevard in Famagusta and is placed as a memorial to the CGR.
.......................................
Personal Photo Album View user's profile Cyprus News,Weather & Travel
 
Post: #10   PostPosted: Tue Sep 28, 2010 11:43 am Reply with quote
Saint George
Joined: 22 Apr 2010
Posts: 279
Pictures: 0

 
Confused I started reading this thread to find out whether developers were breaking EU law and ended up knowing when to prune my lemon tree and when not to catch a train in Cyprus! i just love the way these discussions stay on track! Smile Smile
[/quote]
Personal Photo Album View user's profile Send e-mail Cyprus News,Weather & Travel
 
Post: #11   PostPosted: Tue Sep 28, 2010 12:27 pm Reply with quote
PepsiCan
Joined: 15 Feb 2009
Posts: 1090
Pictures: 0
Location: Larnaka

 
spurs wrote:
PepsiCan wrote:
Tangutica wrote:
Rest assured it won't be a train if you live in Cyprus!
Did you know that there was a train network in Cyprus that was disbanded around WW1? The main line ran from the north east to the south west. You can get a book on it at the Academic & General bookstore in Larnaka.
.......No trains run in Cyprus today; the only forms of transport are now via road, sea or by air: buses, taxis, boats and cruise vessels. But a long time ago there was another form of transport that was spread across all of Cyprus: the magnificent triumph of engineering that was the Cyprus Government Railway (CGR).

The CGR was a 2ft 6in-gauge line with a total of 78 miles, The construction of the line's first 37 miles began in April 1904 it was from Famagusta to Nicosia and opened in October the following year, the journey from Famagusta to Nicosia took about two hours. In December 1907 the line was extended to Morphou which was 27 miles west of Nicosia. Eight years later in June it was extended by 14 miles to Evrykhou, and thus the main line was completed.

It ran for almost 50 years from October 1905 to December 1951, with a total of 39 stations, the most notable at Famagusta, Prastio Mesaoria, Angastina, Trachoni, Nicosia, Kokkinotrimithia, Morphou, Kalo Chorio and Evrychou. The names were written in three languages English, Greek, and Turkish. The average speed of the trains ranged from 20 to 30 mph and two trains would leave per day.

The CGR trains were used in various ways by both authorities and the local population. It was used as a freight transfer system which served from the port of Famagusta. It transferred timber from the Troodos mountain to towns and cities all over Cyprus. It carried freight, ore and minerals on behalf of the Cyprus Mines Corporation. Some stations also operated as telephone centres, telegram offices and postal offices which meant that some of the railway stations acted as a place where you could exchange goods.

The CGR closed down because of financial reasons, the line never made a profit and by 1932 the western end of line was shortened by three stops. While from 1948 Nicosia was the final western stop which meant ten more stations were closed. This also wasn't helped by the new 6 ton diesel lorries which appear which the CGR couldn't compete against. As the railway system, engine and tracks were over 40 years old and it wasn't easy to upgrade each compared to their road bound equivalents.

The last train to ever run left was the engine no.1 which left from Nicosia station at 14:57 on the 31st December 1951 and arrived at Famagusta at 16:38. When it finished its journey it was lifted to its final resting place by army engineers from Dhekelia by a 20 ton crane. The dismantlement after the final run lasted for over two years and 10 locomotives, the tracks and other various items were sold to the company Meyer Newman & Co, amounting up to 65,626. The Locomotive 1 train is still in its resting place in Polat PaYa Boulevard in Famagusta and is placed as a memorial to the CGR.
.......................................

You bought the book, didn't you? Very Happy

Btw, no-one complained about the lack of tunnels in Cyprus. Except if you count that small one between Lemesos and Pafos.
Personal Photo Album View user's profile Send e-mail Cyprus News,Weather & Travel
Are Property Developers breaking E.U. Law 
  Cyprus Eastern Forum Index » General
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
  


All times are GMT  
Page 1 of 1  



  
  
 Post new topic  Reply to topic   
Search Tags: #Property #Developers #breaking



 Link To Cyprus Eastern Forum    YouTube Channel    Cyprus eBay Search    Shopping To Cyprus    Contact Admin   SmartFeed RSS Feed



BUYING PROPERTY IN CYPRUS? PLEASE ENSURE THAT YOU SEEK INDEPENDENT LEGAL ADVICE FIRST.
Cyprus forum covering Kapparis, Protaras, Pernera, Agia Napa, Agia Thekla, Paralimni, Larnaca, Oroklini, Pervolia & surrounding areas
Please note that the views expressed on this forum are those of the author and may not reflect the views of the management.
* Problems Logging In? Click To Contact Us | Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group Design Style: VTrushkin | View Lo-Fi Version