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Posted By: journeyman

16th December 1485 Birth of Catherine of Aragon, first of Henry VIII’s wives. She bore him six children but only one survived (Mary I), and Henry divorced her against the Pope’s wishes, in his pursuit for a male heir. 1653 Following the execution of Charles I, Oliver Cromwell failed to get the Parliament he wanted and became Lord Protector, turning himself into an uncrowned king for the next four years. 1773 Taxes by Britain on tea and other commodities led Samuel Adams and 150 ‘Sons of Liberty’ disguised as Mohawk Indians to hold the Boston Tea Party in which 342 tea chests worth £18,000 were tossed off Griffin’s Wharf into Boston Harbour. The War of Independence had begun. 1882 Sir Jack Hobbs, renowned cricketer and the first of his sport to be knighted, was born. 1914 German warships bombarded the seaside resort of Scarborough, believing it to be a major British port. Several other east coast resorts were also hit. A picture of Scarborough. 1929 Barnes Wallis saw his R100 airship carry out its first test flight. 1944 The Battle of the Bulge began in the Ardennes. By January 21, the Germans had been pushed back to their original line, having lost some 120,000 men in the offensive. 1951 Freddie Steele was transferred from Mansfield to Port Vale, the first footballer to be involved in a transfer deal. 1955 London Heathrow opened its new terminal buildings. 1969 MPs voted by a big majority for the permanent abolition of the death penalty for murder. 1977 The Queen unveiled the new underground link from central London to Heathrow; the first from a capital city to its major airport. 1991 Britain named Stella Rimington as the first woman to head its security service, MI5. 1998 USA & Britain combined bombing attacks on Iraq after UN weapons inspectors were expelled from the country, contrary to assurances given by Saddam Hussein. 2001 Thousands of campaigners took to the streets of Edinburgh to protest against a bill to ban dog-hunting, the uncertain future of rural schools and the handling of the foot and mouth crisis. Graham



Posted By: Jacs

wow, can we have one every day Jacqui

Posted By: Charnwood Fox

Are you volunteering? :wink:

Posted By: journeyman

Yes , Hopefully I will try and update daily. Graham

Posted By: Charnwood Fox

Or, to save Graham all the effort, we could go to b*************n.co.uk I'll leave it to Graham to either continue posting daily or putting up the full link.

Posted By: journeyman

Mark, Yes I could post just the link, but I was hoping others may post items other than mine to make it a bit more interesting :roll: Graham

Posted By: Balconia

I love this idea Graham. Hope members keep it going as i'm sure it will be very interesting .

Posted By: journeyman

17th December
1778 The birthday of Sir Humphrey Davy, English inventor of the safety lamp for miners, who also discovered sodium, magnesium, calcium, barium and strontium.
1843 A Christmas Carol, by Charles Dickens, was published.
1849 Thomas and William Bowler, felt hat makers, sold their first 'bowler' to William Coke, which he purchased at James Lock & Co. in London.
1917 Elizabeth Garrett Anderson, first English woman physician, died.
1933 Members of the public were allowed to walk through the recently completed Mersey Road Tunnel, prior to its opening to traffic.
1942 The British Foreign Secretary, Anthony Eden, told the House of Commons about the mass executions of Jews by Germans in occupied Europe. He also read out a United Nations declaration condemning "this bestial policy".
1954 The British Petroleum Company (BP) was formed.
1967 Alec Rose, aboard Lively Lady, completed his solo 14,500 mile sail, from Britain to Australia.
1968 An 11-year-old girl (Mary Bell) was sentenced to life in detention after being found guilty at Newcastle Assizes of the manslaughter of two small boys. It was said that she strangled the boys, aged four and three, "solely for the pleasure and excitement of killing".
1976 Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates rejected Opec's recommended 15% oil price increase and choose to impose a lower price rise of 5%.
1983 Three police officers and three members of the public were killed and many others injured after a car bomb attack in London. Police believe the IRA planted the bomb in a side street near Harrods department store in Knightsbridge.
1986 Mrs Davina Thompson, in an operation performed at a Cambridge hospital, became the world’s first heart, lungs and liver transplant patient .
2003 Former school caretaker Ian Huntley was convicted of the murders of 10 year olds Holly Wells and Jessica Chapman.
Graham





Posted By: journeyman

18th December
1559 Queen Elizabeth I of England sent aid to the Scottish Lords to drive the French from Scotland.
1707 Birth of Charles Wesley, English hymn writer of 5,500 hymns. He was an evangelist like his brother John, who was the founder of Methodism.
1779 The birth of Joseph Grimaldi, English creator of the original white faced clown.
1792 Radical political writer Thomas Paine was tried for treason, in his absence, for publishing 'The Rights of Man' in which he supported the French Revolution and called for the abolition of the British Monarchy.
1912 The Piltdown Man was discovered in Sussex by Charles Dawson. It was claimed to be the fossilized skull and remains of the earliest known European, but in 1953 it was proved to be a hoax. The skull was that of an orang-utan.
1916 The Battle of Verdun, the longest engagement of World War I, ended after 10 months and massive loss of life. 23 million shells had been fired and 650,000 were killed.
1919 Pioneering aviator John Alcock died in an aircraft accident whilst flying the new Vickers Viking amphibian to the Paris airshow. Alcock and Lt. Arthur Whitten-Brown were the first to make a non-stop transatlantic flight, but after Alcock's death, Brown, never flew again.
1946 Clement Atlee's Labour government won the vote on state ownership. It led to the nationalizing of the railways, ports and mines. Labour MPs triumphantly sang 'The Red Flag'.
1974 The Government said that it would pay £42,000 compensation to relatives of the 13 men killed in the Bloody Sunday riots in Londonderry (30th January 1972).
1987 Ivan Boesky, the former US ‘King of Arbitrage’ was sentenced to three years’ imprisonment for insider stock exchange dealings. Some of Boesky’s revelations led to the investigation by the Department of Trade and Industry in Britain into Guinness’s takeover of Distillers.
1989 The Labour Party abandoned its policy on trade union 'closed shops' in line with European legislation.
1997 A bill giving Scotland its own parliament for the first time in three centuries was unveiled in Glasgow.
Graham

Posted By: journeyman

19th December
1154 Henry II became King of England.
1848 Emily Brontë, English author of Wuthering Heights, died of tuberculosis at the tender age of 30. Find out more about Haworth and the Brontës.
1851 The renowned landscape painter, Joseph Turner, died in a lodging house in Chelsea, London
1863 Frederick Walton of London patented a new floor covering called linoleum.
1905 London County Council set up Britain's first motorised ambulance service for the victims of traffic accidents.
1915 World War I: British, Australian and New Zealand troops began their withdrawal from Gallipoli after failing to defeat the Turks.
1956 At least six people died and several others were injured in road accidents in thick fog, with visibility as low as 4.5 metres in many parts of England. There was also chaos on the railways, at airports and with shipping.
1957 The start of a regular air service between London and Moscow.
1972 Ugandan leader General Idi Amin gave British workers an ultimatum; to accept reduced pay or be expelled.
1972 Irish footballer George Best was sacked from his club, Manchester United.
1981 The 8 man crew of the Penlee Lifeboat all lost their lives attempting to rescue the crew of the coaster Union Star that was wrecked in violent seas off the coast of Cornwall.
1984 Britain and China signed an agreement in Beijing, in which Britain agreed to transfer full sovereignty of Hong Kong to China in 1997.
1984 Ted Hughes was named the 18th Poet Laureate, in succession to Sir John Betjeman.
1997 Former Conservative party leader William Hague married his fiancée Ffion Jenkins at a ceremony in Westminster.
Graham

Posted By: Jacs

ON THIS DAY 19/12/1995 ALLAN (NOW MY HUSBAND) FIRST ASKED ME OUT. LITTLE DID I KNOW THEN THAT WE WOULD GET MARRIED AND BE MAKING PLANS TO MOVE TO CYPRUS. JACQUI :-):-)

Posted By: journeyman

20th December
1649 Theatres were banned by Oliver Cromwell.
1805 Thomas Graham, the Scottish chemist who discovered the principle of dialysis, was born.
1910 The British General Election produced a tied vote, with the Liberal Party and the Tory Party each winning 272 seats.
1920 An English born comedian named Leslie Downes, who later changed his name to Bob Hope, became an American citizen on this day. He had lived in the United States since 1908 and became one of America's true ambassadors for show business and charity.
1926 Geoffrey Howe, British politician, was born.
1928 Harry Ramsden started his fish and chip restaurant in a hut near Bradford, West Yorkshire. It soon became the most famous fish and chip restaurant in the world.
1928 The England cricket team scored a record 636 against Australia in Sydney, including 251 scored by Walter Hammond. England won the Test match by eight wickets.
1954 James Hilton, the English author of the classic book 'Goodbye Mr Chips', died.
1955 Cardiff was officially named the capital of Wales.
1969 Rolf Harris had the Christmas No.1 of 1969 and the last No.1 of the 1960s with 'Two Little Boys'. The song stayed at No.1 for six weeks.
1979 The introduction of Britain's Housing Bill - forcing local councils to sell their houses to any tenants who wish to buy them.
1988 Animal rights terrorists fire bombed Harrod's department store in London.
1990 The Maerdy Colliery, employing 320 men, closed. It was the last remaining coal mine in the Rhondda Valley, an area which once produced 9million tonnes a year, and where more than 50,000 miners had worked in 54 pits.
1995 The Queen urged the Prince Charles and Princess Diana to seek an early divorce.
Graham

Posted By: journeyman

21st December
1118 Birth of Thomas à Becket, future Archbishop of Canterbury and martyr, in Cheapside.
1620 The Pilgrim Fathers arrived at Plymouth Rock , Massachusetts aboard The Mayflower. Passengers & crew increased to 103 after 2 births on the voyage from Plymouth, England.
1804 The birth of Benjamin Disraeli, first Earl of Beaconsfield and British Prime Minister. He became the first Conservative Prime Minister in 1868, but was defeated at the next election. He was Prime Minister again in 1874 with a substantial majority.
1842 Pentonville Prison, Islington, was opened.
1846 Robert Liston used anaesthetic (ether) for the first time in a British operation at University College Hospital, London, to perform an amputation of a leg.
1880 An act passed by the House of Keys on the Isle of Man granted women the vote, provided they were widows or spinsters with a property rated annually at £4 or over. The first opportunity to vote was in April, the following year. In 1901, Norwegian women were allowed to vote, but in local elections only.
1962 President Kennedy and Prime Minister Harold Macmillan agreed that the UK would buy nuclear missiles from the US to form a multilateral NATO nuclear force.
1963 Under soil heating was used for the first time at the Leeds Rugby League ground for their match against Dewsbury.
1963 Sir Jack Hobbs, English cricketer, died.
1977 The Trades Union Congress General Council narrowly voted to reject firemen's demands for a public campaign against a 10% limit on wage increases. The union decided by 20 votes to 17 not to support the firemen who were in their sixth week of strike action for better pay and conditions.
1988 A Pan American jumbo jet bound for New York was blown out of the sky by a terrorist bomb and crashed onto the Scottish town of Lockerbie, killing all 259 passengers and 11 people on the ground.
1990 In a German television interview, Saddam Hussein declared that he would not withdraw from Kuwait by the UN deadline.
Graham
And of Course Geoff was Born :-) :->

Posted By: Deb&Geoff

You missed off: 1964 - I was born. :D No need to do the maths - that makes me 40 (ish)! :^o Geoff.

Posted By: Steve - SJD

Geoff,
Unless i've got completely the wrong end of the stick -
Happy Birthday!!
Hope you have a good one!
Cheers
Steve
P.S. Thanks for the updates Graham!



Posted By: Balconia

Loving This - Again thanks for the updates Graham. Happy Birthday Geoff !! :wink: :cry: :oops: :oops: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

Posted By: Deb&Geoff

Thanks Steve & Carol, Funny thing is I've looked back at the thread about 3 times and just noticed the edit - thanks Graham. Interesting to read what happened on the day I was born. On a serious note I really can't remember the Lockerbie bombing being on my birthday - I can remember feeling for the poor people involved but didn't realise it was the day of my birthday. Geoff.

Posted By: journeyman

Geoff,
You also share your Birthday with the following.........
21-Dec
1879 Joseph Stalin
1892 Dame Rebecca West
1921 William Reid V.C
1940 Frank Zappa
1946 Carl Wilson
1959 Florence Griffith Joyner
1937 Jane Fonda
1948 Samuel L Jackson
1954 Chris Evert
Graham

Posted By: steve&maureen

on this day i became the legal owner of my apartment at dionissos court, much to the relief of the developer Sk and my solicitor Tommy!!!!

Posted By: journeyman

22nd December
1715 James Edward Stuart, son of James II, the deposed Catholic King of England, landed at Petershead in north-east Scotland, after his exile in France, to lead a Jacobite rebellion against England. The rebellion failed.
1716 Lincoln's Inn Theatre in London put on England's first pantomime which included the characters Harlequin, Columbine and Pantaloon.
1919 The Government of Ireland Act of Power (Home Rule for Ireland) came into being. It was signed by King George V. Ireland was divided into two parts, each with its own parliament.
1943 The children's writer, Beatrix Potter, died. Her house at Hiill Top, Sawrey is open to the public.
1951 The birth of Gerald Cavendish Grosvenor, 6th Duke of Westminster. He is second only to the Queen, as Britain's richest landlord.
1962 Pop group the Tornados started a three week run at No.1 on the US singles chart with their record Telstar. It was the first major hit from a UK act in the American charts.
1965 The government introduced an 'experimental' speed limit of 70mph on motorways in England. The limit is still in force.
1965 Richard Dimbleby, British broadcaster, died.
1973 Elton John started a two week run at No.1 on the UK chart with the album Goodbye Yellow Brick Road. The album featured the song Candle in the Wind that was later re-written after the death of Princess Diana.
1974 Terrorists bombed the home of the Conservative leader and former Prime Minister Edward Heath.
1982 Heavy snow fell across much of Britain, causing chaos with up to 8 inches of snow.
1997 An independent inquiry into the BSE disaster and the devastation it wreaked on British farming was announced by the government.
2000 The American singer Madonna married British film maker Guy Ritchie at an exclusive ceremony in a Scottish castle, hours after their son was christene
AND TRAVELSCOPE HAVE GONE UNDER STOPPING MY HOLIDAY TO CANADA IN MARCH, ANGRY ME :evil: :evil:
Graham

Posted By: journeyman

23rd December
1812 The birth of Samuel Smiles, English author of the book Self Help (1859). It sold over 250,000 copies and was followed by other self-improvement books such as Thrift (1875). The books were the tools of Victorian virtues.
1813 A great freeze began. It lasted until well into February.
1834 English architect Joseph Hansom patented the horse drawn taxi, known as the Hansom Cab.
1848 The London Illustrated News published the first Christmas supplement with advice on ‘making the Christmas Pudding’.
1888 Birth, in Hull, of the film magnate J. Arthur Rank.
1905 The earliest recorded British beauty show was held at Newcastle Upon Tyne, in north-east England. A picture of Newcastle Upon Tyne, minus the 'beauties'!
1922 The BBC began regular daily radio news broadcasts.
1940 World War II: British Prime Minister Winston Churchill urged the Italians to rid themselves of dictator Benito Mussolini.
1956 The United Nations Emergency Force took over in Egypt after British and French forces withdrew from Port Said and Port Fuad ending the Suez Crisis.
1964 The government announced that Dr. Richard Beeching who instigated major and controversial changes to the rail network was to quit his post.
1970 The Mousetrap reached its 7511th consecutive performance to break the world record for the longest running play.
1987 The first ‘Scrooge’ award by the Low Pay Unit was made to a Wiltshire stable-owner who paid a qualified groom only £28 a week. The runner-up was a doctor employing a telephonist for 30p an hour. The prize was an illustrated edition of A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens.
1992 The BBC investigated a leak which led to the Queen's Christmas speech being published in a national newspaper.
Graham

Posted By: journeyman

24th December - Christmas Eve
1914 World War 1 - Not a shot was fired, as German & British soldiers played football & handed out drinks, cigars & souvenirs. It was possibly the most poignant moment of the 'Great War' & for several days afterwards the two sides appeared reluctant to fire on the men they had met face to face.

----------------------------------------
1167 Birth of King John, youngest son of Henry II, who was forced by the barons to sign the Magna Carta. When he tried to revoke his authorization, civil war broke out.
1650 Edinburgh Castle in Scotland surrendered to troops commanded by Oliver Cromwell.
1814 The war of 1812 between the US and Britain was brought to an end with the signing of the Treaty of Ghent.
1828 William Burke who, with his partner William Hare, dug up the dead and murdered to sell the corpses for dissection, went on trial in Edinburgh. The other bodysnatcher, William Hare, had turned King’s evidence and was not therefore brought to trial.
1904 The London Coliseum opened with the first revolving stage in Britain.
1914 A German monoplane dropped a single bomb on Dover, the first ever to be dropped on British soil. It landed on a rectory garden lawn and blew out the house windows.
1922 The BBC broadcast The Truth About Father Christmas by Phillis M Twigg, the first play written for radio in Britain.
1932 Colin Cowdrey, MCC President and former England test captain, was born.
1965 A meteorite weighing about 100 lb (45kg) was the largest to fall on Britain and landed in the village of Barwell, Leicestershire.
1974 Former minister John Stonehouse was found in Australia after faking his own death.
1988 Three North Sea oil fields were shut down after a giant floating storage vessel, the Medora, broke free of its moorings in gale-force winds.
Graham



Posted By: journeyman

25th December - Christmas Day

440 Church leaders agreed to fix the date of the birth of Christ. Previously some people had celebrated it in May, others in January.
1066 William the Conqueror was crowned at Westminster Abbey.
1176 The first Eisteddfod (Festival of the Arts) took place at Cardigan Castle.
1642 Isaac Newton, the English scientist who formulated the laws of motion, was born.
1652 The Puritan government ordered all Churches to remain closed on Christmas Day.
1688 King James II was overthrown during the 'Glorious Revolution' and escaped to France.
1800 The first Christmas tree in Britain was erected at Queen’s Lodge, Windsor by the German-born Queen Charlotte, wife of George III. She brought the idea over from Germany where the first reports of Christmas trees go back to 1521.
1864 The traditional swim in the ice-cold Serpentine in London’s Hyde Park was initiated.
1866 The US yacht Henrietta sailed into Cowes harbour on the Isle of Wight, and thus became the winner of the first Transatlantic Yacht Race.
1914 The Christmas truce between British and German troops continued. At 2 a.m. a German band went along the trenches playing Home Sweet Home and God Save the King.
1932 King George V made the first Royal Christmas broadcast to the Empire. Queen Elizabeth II made her first Christmas broadcast in 1952, and her first television Christmas message was broadcast in 1957.
1950 The Stone of Scone, the Scottish coronation stone which had been in Westminster Abbey for 650 years was stolen by Scottish nationalists. The Stone, weighing 458lb (208kg) was said to have been taken from Scotland by Edward I.
1977 Charlie Chaplin, the English born comic genius of silent films, died, aged 88.
2003 Scientists failed to make contact with British-built Mars probe Beagle 2, which should have landed on the Red Planet 'on this day'.
And a Very Merry Christmas to All.
Graham

Posted By: Steve - SJD

Thanks Graham!! Cheers Steve

Posted By: journeyman

26th December

1716 Thomas Gray, English poet, was born.
1791 The birth of Charles Babbage, English mathematician, philosopher, and mechanical engineer who originated the idea of a programmable computer.
1874 Boxing Day was officially recognised in Britain as a Bank Holiday. The name originates from the custom of Christmas boxes being given to a lord's serfs and dates back to the middle ages.
1913 A large Hippodrome was opened at Golders Green as a variety hall to take advantage of the newly arrived London underground.
1932 The BBC presented the first televised pantomime, Dick Whittington.
1943 A Royal Navy convoy, including the battleship Duke of York and cruiser Jamaica, attacked and sank the mighty German battlecruiser Scharnhorst, the last major German battleship.
1948 The first annual Reith Lecture on the BBC, entitled Authority and the Individual. (Lord Reith was the first general manager, and subsequently director-general, of the BBC.)
1959 The first charity walk took place, along the Icknield Way (Buckinghamshire & Norfolk), in aid of the World Refugee Fund.
1970 British Olympic medallist Lillian Board, MBE, died after losing her battle against a virulent form of cancer. The twice European Gold medallist and Olympic silver medallist who helped set four world records on the track, died late in the afternoon after she slipped into a coma on Christmas Eve.
1988 Crash investigators uncovered wreckage which they hoped would hold the key to the Lockerbie air disaster of 21st December.
1988 Junior doctors protested against their long working hours.
1990 Desert Orchid won the 'King George VI Chase' at Kempton Park for a record 4th time.
2001 A man captured as he tried to ignite explosives hidden in his trainers aboard an American Airlines jet was identified as Richard Reid, a 28-year old unemployed British citizen.
Graham

Posted By: journeyman

27th December
1773 The birth of Sir George Cayley, English pioneer of the study of aerodynamics. In 1853 he built the first successful glider to be flown by a man, his reluctant coachman! One of his later inventions was the caterpillar tractor.
1831 English naturalist Charles Darwin sailed from Plymouth on board his ship, HMS Beagle. His scientific voyage of discovery lasted five years and led to the publication (in 1859) of his highly controversial book The Origin of Species which fuelled the 'creation versus evolution' debate. In recognition of Darwin's outstanding work, he was buried in Westminster Abbey, next to his friend and eminent scientist John Herschel and close to Isaac Newton.
1836 At least 8 people were killed at Lewes, Sussex, in Britain's worst avalanche disaster.
1904 The first performance in London of James Barrie’s Peter Pan, with Nina Boucicault as the first Peter and Gerald du Maurier as Captain Hook.
1918 A British sovereign welcomed an American President to Britain for the first time when King George V and Queen Mary met President and Mrs. Wilson at Charing Cross Railway Station and then escorted them to Buckingham Palace. A state banquet was held at the palace and President Wilson visited Carlisle, his mother’s home.
1965 Thirteen people were killed when Britain's first North Sea drilling rig (Sea Gem) capsized.
1975 The Sex Discrimination and Equal Pay Acts came into effect in Britain.
1977 Thousands of people flocked to UK cinemas to watch the long-awaited blockbuster, Star Wars.
1984 Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher was voted Woman of the Year, on Radio 4's Today programme. According to a Gallup Poll she was the woman most admired by the American people; the third consecutive year that the 'Iron Lady' had received that honour.
1997 Windsor Castle was reopened to the public following restoration work. 100 rooms of the palace were damaged in a fire in 1992.
1997 A leading protestant paramilitary, Billy Wright, was shot dead at the maximum security Maze prison in Northern Ireland. Wright was the leader of a dissident paramilitary group, the Loyalist Volunteer Force, one of several Protestant militias that wanted Northern Ireland to remain in British hands.
Graham

Posted By: journeyman

28th December

1065 Westminster Abbey was consecrated. Its founder Edward the Confessor could not attend due to illness. He died on 5th January l066 and was buried in a shrine before the High Altar in his new church.
1694 Mary II, Queen of England, Scotland and Ireland, died from small pox, leaving William III to reign alone.
1879 The Tay railway bridge collapsed whilst the Edinburgh to Dundee train was crossing. The engine and carriages plummeted into the icy river below, killing 90 people. In 1979 British Rail commissioned a special train to take people across the new bridge at the exact time of the original accident - 19:15 GMT.
1904 The first weather reports relayed by wireless telegraphy were published in London.
1932 Roy Hattersley, Labour MP & former Labour deputy leader, was born.
1934 The first Test Match for women’s cricket was between Australia and England and was held at Brisbane.
1950 The Peak District became Britain’s first National Park.
1957 One of Britain's largest abattoirs (the Stanley abattoir in Liverpool) closed down after foot and mouth disease was found in cattle waiting to be slaughtered.
1963 'That Was The Week That Was', television’s first satirical show, was broadcast for the last time. It was pulled off while still commanding huge audiences because 1964 was to be election year and it was felt that the show could influence voters.
1980 A shake-up of broadcasting franchises paved the way for the launch of breakfast TV. The Independent Broadcasting Authority announced that the breakfast contract would go to TV-am and would launch in 1983.
1993 British customs officials seized £70m of Colombian cocaine (at Felixstowe) thought to be linked to the Mafia.
2003 The British Government announced plans to tighten airline security by allowing armed guards on some British flights to the USA.
Graham

Posted By: journeyman

29th December

1170 Archbishop of Canterbury, Thomas à Becket, was murdered in his own cathedral by four knights believing they were acting on direct orders from King Henry II.
1675 Parliament ordered the closing of all coffee houses on the basis that they were centres of malicious gossip about the Government.
1766 Charles Macintosh, the inventor of waterproof clothing, was born in Glasgow.
1809 The birth, in Liverpool, of William (Ewart) Gladstone, four times British Prime Minister His first election in 1868 allowed him to carry out major reforms. He was elected once more in 1880 and then again in 1866. When his Home Rule Bill was defeated, he resigned, but became Prime Minister, for a fourth term, in 1892. He resigned again two years later, this time when his Home Rule Bill was rejected by the Lords. He died of cancer on 19th May 1898 and was buried in Westminster Abbey.
1860 HMS Warrior, Britain's first seagoing iron-clad warship, was launched. She froze to the slipway when she was launched during London's coldest winter for 50 years and six tugs were required to haul her into the river.
1895 The beginning of the Jameson Raid into the Transvaal to aid the Uitlanders (mainly British settlers) in the Boer Colony.
1918 The Sunday Express was published for the first time.
1940 London suffered its most devastating air raid when Germans firebombed the city. Hundreds of fires caused by the exploding bombs engulfed areas of London, but fire fighters showed a valiant indifference to the bombs falling around them and saved much of the city from destruction. The next day, a newspaper photo of St. Paul's Cathedral standing undamaged amid the smoke and flames seemed to symbolize the capital's unconquerable spirit during the Battle of Britain.
1975 New legislation introducing a woman's right to equal pay and status in the workplace, and in society, came into force in the UK.
1986 Lord Stockton, the former Prime Minister Harold Macmillan, died aged 92.
1997 British journalist Dawn Alford, of the Daily Mirror, who claimed a Cabinet Minister's son had sold her drugs, was arrested on suspicion of possessing cannabis, hoisted (as the saying goes) by her own petard!
Graham

Posted By: journeyman

30th December
1460 The defeat of the Duke of York at the Battle of Wakefield in the Wars of the Roses. Richard of York, the Earl of Rutland and the Earl of Salisbury were all killed.
1851 The artist JMW Turner was buried, at his own request, in the crypt of St Paul's Cathedral.
1865 Rudyard Kipling, English poet and author of The Jungle Book, was born in India.
1879 First performance of the Gilbert and Sullivan comic opera The Pirates of Penzance, at the Royal Bijou Theatre, Paignton, Devon.
1887 A petition, signed by more than 1 million women in Britain, was sent to Queen Victoria calling for public houses to be closed on Sundays.
1922 In Wellington, the start of the first Test Match between England and New Zealand.
1932 The completion of the electrification of the London to Brighton railway line.
1937 Gordon Banks, English goal keeper, was born.
1946 Football league players threatened to strike over the proposed maximum wage of £11 a week.
1954 British athlete Chris Chataway became the first winner of the BBC's Sports Personality of the Year award.
1956 The last passenger train service on the Liverpool Overhead Railway, after 63 years in operation.
1986 According to new plans by the government, more than 200 canaries would be 'phased out' of Britain's mining pits. New electronic devices would replace canaries as detectors of harmful gasses, because they were said to be cheaper in the long run and more effective.
1999 Former Beatle George Harrison and his wife Olivia were attacked when an intruder broke into their home. Harrison was stabbed in the chest and was admitted to hospital.
2001 Prime Minister Tony Blair urged India and Pakistan to show restraint as tension grew between the two nations.
Graham



Posted By: journeyman

31st December - (New Year’s Eve, and Hogmanay in Scotland)
1695 The window tax was imposed in Britain. It resulted in many being bricked up, evidence which remains to this day.
1720 The birth, in Rome, of Bonnie Prince Charlie (Charles Edward Stuart), also known as the ‘Young Pretender’. He landed in Scotland, with his followers, in 1745, capturing Edinburgh and setting up court at the Palace of Holyrood. His decision to march on London brought him head on with an army led by the Duke of Cumberland, and defeat at Culloden.
1738 Charles Cornwallis, the British soldier whose surrender to George Washington ended the War of Independence, was born.
1892 The first hostel for homeless men, Rowton House, opened in Bond Street, Vauxhall.
1900 For the first time since 1797, a large upright stone and lintel suddenly fell over at the Stonehenge prehistoric monument site in Wiltshire.
1917 First World War: Sugar was rationed in Britain as a result of shortages.
1923 The chimes of Big Ben were broadcast on radio for the first time by the BBC.
1927 The end of the use of the lance by the British army.
1948 Malcolm Campbell, British racing driver, died.
1960 The British coin, the farthing, in use in Britain since the 13th Century, ceased to be legal tender at midnight.
1964 Donald Campbell broke the world water speed record, (at Dumbleyung Lake, Western Australia, 276.33 mph), the only man to break both land and water speed records in the same year.
1973 The three-day week began in Britain as a result of power strikes. It led to the downfall of Prime Minister Edward Heath and his government.
1987 A total of 31 people received New Year's Honours for helping to save an estimated 350 passengers when the Herald of Free Enterprise capsized, near Bruges, on 6th March claiming 193 lives. The George Medal, one of the highest civilian awards for gallantry, was awarded to head waiter Michael Skippen who died trying to get passengers to safety.
Graham

Posted By: journeyman

1st January

1660 Samuel Pepys began writing the Diary which he kept for nine years, writing in an early form of shorthand.
1766 The death in Rome of ‘the Old Pretender’, James Stuart, father of Bonnie Prince Charlie.
1772 The London Credit Exchange Company issued the first traveller’s cheques, accepted in 90 cities and guaranteed against theft.
1781 The first all-iron bridge in the world, Iron Bridge in Shropshire, was opened to traffic.
1785 John Walter published the first issue of the Daily Universal Register. In 1788 it was renamed The Times.
1876 Bass Ale’s ‘Red Triangle’ became the first registered trade mark in Britain.
1887 The British Prime Minister, Disraeli, had Queen Victoria proclaimed Empress of India.
1894 The opening of the Manchester Ship Canal linking Manchester to the River Mersey. Queen Victoria later formally opened the canal, on 21st May 1894.
1944 Death of Sir Edwin Landseer Lutyens, English architect of the Whitehall Cenotaph.
1951 The first episode of the BBC’s radio serial The Archers - farming folk of Ambridge.
1962 The Beatles had an audition for Decca Records, who turned them down and signed Brian Poole and the Tremeloes instead.
1964 Jimmy Savile presented the very first Top of the Pops, the longest running music show in the world. He also co-hosted the last, on 30th July 2006.
1965 Stanley Matthews was knighted, the first professional footballer to receive this honour.
1973 The UK became a fully-fledged member of the European Economic Community.
1995 Fred West, the 53 year old Gloucestershire builder charged with 12 murders, was found dead in his prison cell.
Graham
HAPPY NEW YEAR

Posted By: journeyman

2nd January

1727 The birth of the British general James Wolfe, who died capturing Quebec from the French.
1757 Robert Clive (Clive of India) captured Calcutta. It had been seized by the Nawab of Bengal, who imprisoned 146 British in the infamous ‘black hole’. Only 23 survived.
1769 The Royal Academy opened, with English painter Sir Joshua Reynolds as president.
1788 Named after King George II, Georgia becomes the fourth state of the U.S.A.
1868 Birth of Arthur William Charles ‘Wentworth’ Gore, the English tennis player. He competed at Wimbledon on every occasion from 1888 to 1927, winning the men’s singles championship in 1901 and 1908, and became the oldest winner in 1909.
1893 The Financial Times first appeared on pink paper.
1905 Birth of Sir Michael Tippett, English composer. His oratorio A Child of Our Time demonstrated his strong concern for social issues. During the war he tried, and failed, to get exemption as a conscientious objector, and was imprisoned.
1938 Birth of David Bailey, English photographer.
1969 The Australian media magnate, Rupert Murdoch, beat off a rival bid to win control of the News of the World newspaper group. It was his first Fleet Street newspaper.
1971 Sixty six spectators were crushed to death when a barrier collapsed at the Ibrox Park football ground in Glasgow.
1974 Museums and Galleries began charging admission for the first time
1980 Steel workers staged their first national strike for more than fifty years.
1987 The publishers of Enid Blyton's Noddy books bowed to pressure groups and agreed to expunge 'racism' by changing golliwogs to gnomes.
1996 Sweeping reforms to the Royal Ulster Constabulary were announced following a wave of IRA murders.
Graham

Posted By: journeyman

3rd January
1777 The Battle of Princeton ended with George Washington’s defeat of the British, led by Cornwallis.
1795 Death of Josiah Wedgwood, English potter. The pottery he founded remains one of the most famous in the world.
1883 Birth of Clement (Richard) Attlee, British Labour Prime Minister from 1945 to 1951, during which time he carried out dramatic social reforms.
1911 Police, with the army in attendance, stormed a house in London's East End where it was thought a gang of wanted anarchists were hiding. Newspapers dubbed the incident 'The Siege of Sidney Street'. When the fugitives shot at police, the Scots Guards were summoned from the Tower of London, and Winston Churchill, who was then Home Secretary, arrived on the scene to find the house in flames. No firefighters were sent in to put out the blaze, and the house eventually collapsed, burning the anarchists to death.
1924 English explorer Howard Carter discovered the tomb of Tutankhamun in the Valley of the Kings, near Luxor, Egypt.
1940 Unity Mitford, one of the famous Mitford girls, returned to England after an unsuccessful suicide attempt in Munich. She had been greatly attracted to Fascism and idolized Hitler. When Britain declared war she was so distraught that she shot herself.
1942 Birth of John Thaw, British actor who starred in The Sweeney and Inspector Morse.
1946 William Joyce (Lord Haw-Haw) was hanged for treason in London. The Irishman had broadcast propaganda from Nazi Germany during the Second World War.
1961 The production of the millionth Morris Minor, designed by Sir Alec Issigonis.
1977 Former Home Secretary Roy Jenkins announced that he was leaving Westminster politics to become Britain's first President of the European Commission.
1988 Margaret Thatcher became the longest-serving British Prime Minister of the 20th century.
1991 The Foreign Office expelled eight Iraqi embassy officials from the UK following threats of attacks on Western targets.
Graham

Posted By: journeyman

4th January

1642 Under the orders of King Charles I, armed soldiers entered Parliament. The English Civil War started shortly afterwards.
1643 Sir Isaac Newton, British mathematician and scientist, was born.
1813 Birth of Sir Isaac Pitman, English inventor of the first major shorthand system.
1890 The Daily Graphic was launched; the first daily illustrated paper. It merged with the Daily Sketch in 1926. .
1932 Gandhi was arrested and his National Congress of India declared illegal by the British administration.
1938 Bertram Mills’ Circus became the first circus to be shown on television. This was also the first time that a paying audience for any event had been televised, and audience members were informed that they could request seats out of range of the cameras.
1957 A dissatisfied rhinoplasty patient was sentenced in London to ten years’ imprisonment, after he had threatened his surgeon with a gun, complaining that his nose was too short.
1958 Sir Edmund Hillary arrived at the South Pole, the first explorer to do so since Scott in 1912.
1967 Donald Campbell, 46 year old son of Sir Malcolm Campbell, died in his attempt to break his own world water speed record on Coniston Water in the Lake District. His boat, Bluebird K7, somersaulted at high speed, and Campbell died instantly. His body was not recovered until 2001.
1972 Rose Heilbron became Britain’s first woman judge at the Old Bailey.
1982 Erika Rowe became the first sports 'streaker' when she ran across the Twickenham ground at the England v Australia rugby match waving her bra in the air. She was arrested, with policeman covering her 40" breasts with their helmets!
1998 Loyalist prisoners in the Maze Prison, Northern Ireland, voted to withdraw support for the Ulster Peace Process. They claimed that too many concessions had been made to Republicans.
2000 Catherine Hartley and Fiona Thornewill, the first British women to walk across Antarctica to the South Pole arrived safely, more than two months after starting their record-breaking journey.
Graham

Posted By: journeyman

5th January

1066 The death of Edward the Confessor, the last Anglo-Saxon king of England. He was called ‘the Confessor’ because of his great piety. His death led to the Norman Conquest.
1531 Pope Clemens VII forbade English King Henry VIII to re-marry. The event led to the creation of the Church of England.
1906 Kathleen Kenyon, British archaeologist, was born. She used radio carbon dating to date the remains of Jericho.
1922 Sir Ernest Shackleton, British Antarctic explorer, died off South Georgia. It was his fourth expedition, aimed at circumnavigating the Antarctic.
1938 The BBC began broadcasting Bandwagon, its first radio comedy series, with Arthur Askey and Richard ‘Stinker’ Murdoch.
1941 Amy Johnson, record-breaking English aviator, died whilst flying an aircraft from Blackpool to Kidlington (Oxfordshire) in foggy conditions. Her plane was found, 100 miles off course, in the muddy water of the Thames, but her body was never recovered. She was one of the world’s great aviators, having flown solo from Britain to Australia.
1960 The last journey of the Mumbles Railway, the oldest in the world. It was set up in 1804 as a goods railway running from Swansea to Mumbles Head, Wales, and began carrying passengers in 1807.
1971 One-day cricket was born when 46,000 turned up to watch England play Australia at Melbourne. The test match had been rained off for several days previously.
1976 Ten Protestants were brutally gunned down in Northern Ireland, in what was believed to be a revenge killing after the murder of five Catholics.
1981 Peter Sutcliffe, a 35-year-old lorry driver from Bradford, suspected of carrying out 13 murders across West Yorkshire over a period of five years, was formally charged in court.
1993 The oil tanker 'Braer' was wrecked in hurricane force winds off the Shetland Islands, discharging large amounts of crude oil.
2001 A report funded by The Department of Health found that the convicted serial killer, former GP Harold Shipman, may have killed in excess of 300 of his patients.
Graham

Posted By: journeyman

6th January - Twelfth Night
Twelfth Night (after Christmas). In the mid 19th century, it was the custom in London for groups of boys to assemble around pastry shops and nail the coat tails of unsuspecting pedestrians to the wooden window frame as they paused to look into the shop!
871 King Alfred defeated the Danes at the Battle of Ashdown.
1066 The coronation of Harold II, as King of England, succeeding Edward the Confessor. He reigned for ten months before he died at the Battle of Hastings.
1367 Birth in Bordeaux of King Richard II, the last of the Plantagenet kings of England. He was the son of Edward the Black Prince.
1412 The birth of St Joan of Arc, the Maid of Orléans. She was a great heroine of French history and believed that she had a divine mission to drive the British from France. She died at the stake after being captured by the Burgundians and sold to the British.
1540 King Henry VIII married ‘the Flanders Mare’, Anne of Cleves, his fourth wife. The King found her so different from her picture that he swore they had brought him a Flanders mare.
1928 Four people were drowned, and many paintings in the basement of the Tate Gallery were severely damaged, when the Thames flooded. The water was deep enough to fill the moat of the Tower of London.
1938 The 82-year-old Sigmund Freud, the pioneer of psychoanalysis, arrived in London from Vienna with several of his students, to escape the persecution of Jews.
1977 The music publisher EMI ended its contract with the notorious punk rock group, Sex Pistols, after reports of abusive behaviour at Heathrow Airport.
1983 The Royal Navy arrested a Danish trawler captain (Kent Kirk) for illegally entering British waters in the first confrontation of the ' fish war'. The move followed Denmark's refusal to agree to proposals for a new EEC fishing regime.
1987 The first episode of TV's Inspector Morse was broadcast. It was based in Oxford.
1999 Prince Edward and Sophie Rhys-Jones (the Duke and Duchess of Wessex) announced their engagement.
Graham





Posted By: journeyman

7th January
1536 Catherine of Aragon, first wife of Henry VIII of England and mother of Mary I, died.
1558 English forces were ousted from the French port of Calais, led by the Duke of Guise. The town's burghers had surrendered to an invading English army in 1346.
1618 Francis Bacon became Lord Chancellor of England. Later that year he was accused of taking a bribe, and fined £40,000, a huge sum of money for those times.
1805 The famous pugilist Tom Cribb had his first public fight. It was against Tom Maddox at Wood Green. Cribb was declared the winner after an incredible 76 rounds.
1889 Birth of Arthur Clifford Hartley, the English inventor of World War II’s PLUTO (Pipeline Under The Ocean) and FIDO (Fog Investigation Dispersal Operation).
1904 The CQD distress signal was introduced. CQ stood for ‘seek you’, and the D for ‘danger’. It lasted just two years before being replaced with SOS.
1927 A telephone service began operating between London and New York. A three-minute call cost £15. Nevertheless 31 different people made a call on the first day.
1965 Identical twin brothers Ronald and Reginald Kray were in custody, charged in connection with running a protection racket. When they died, their funerals were like those of royals, but they were simply notorious criminals with a history of violence and murder in London’s East End.
1976 The Ministry of Defence claimed that a British naval frigate, HMS Andromeda, had been deliberately rammed into by an Icelandic gunboat in the Atlantic. The ‘attack’ was one of several incidents between Britain and Iceland with regard to disputed fishing territory.
1988 The death of the actor Trevor Howard.
1994 After a wait of 800 years, girls were invited to join the Cathedral Choir at Wells in Somerset. Click here for a picture of Wells Cathedral (file size 152K)
2000 Former Cabinet minister Jonathan Aitken was released from jail after serving less than half of his 18-month sentence. He had been imprisoned for perjury and perverting the course of justice after his libel case against the Guardian Newspaper and Granada Television
Graham

Posted By: journeyman

8th January

1746 Bonnie Prince Charlie occupied Stirling. Such early successes would prove short-lived for the pretender to the throne.
1800 London opened its first soup kitchens for the poor.
1815 Britain lost the last battle it ever fought against the US in the War of 1812. General Sir Edward Pakenham and his men were defeated at New Orleans.
1871 Birth of James Craig, the first prime minister of Northern Ireland and the first Viscount Craigavon.
1921 David Lloyd George became the first Prime Minister to reside in Chequers, a country mansion in Buckinghamshire which had been given by Lord Lee of Fareham as a gift to the nation.
1941 Robert Baden-Powell, founder of the Scout movement, died, aged 83.
1942 The birth of Stephen Hawking, possibly the most brilliant theoretical physicist since Albert Einstein. He wrote A Brief History of Time, which stayed on the British Sunday Times bestseller list for a record-breaking 237 weeks. His book sold at least 25,000,000 copies, was no doubt read by thousands and maybe understood by hundreds!
1967 The Forsyte Saga, the television adaptation of Galsworthy’s novel, screened its first episode. It was so popular that for the six months of its run, many churches had to change the times of their services!
1982 Spain reopened the frontier of the British colony of Gibraltar. In return, Britain agreed to open negotiations on Gibraltar’s future, and ended its opposition to Spain joining the EEC.
1989 47 people were killed and over 80 injured when a British Midland 737-400 jet crashed on the M1 motorway, less than half a mile from East Midlands Airport. One engine had had to be switched off and the other had suddenly shut down, forcing the plane into an emergency landing.
2001 The High Court ruled that the identities and whereabouts of the two boys who murdered toddler James Bulger in 1993 would be kept secret for the rest of their lives.
2004 The liner RMS Queen Mary 2, was named by Queen Elizabeth II. She is the largest, longest, widest, tallest and most expensive passenger ship in history.
Graham

Posted By: journeyman

9th January
1735 The birth of British admiral, John Jervis (Earl of St. Vincent). In 1797, he and Nelson, who was then a captain, defeated the Spanish fleet off Cape St. Vincent.
1799 Income tax was introduced into Britain by William Pitt the Younger, to raise funds for the Napoleonic War. The rate was two shillings in the pound.
1806 Lord Nelson, (born in Burnham Thorpe, Norfolk) naval commander and hero of the Battle of Trafalgar, was buried beneath the dome of St Paul's cathedral, in London, after a grand and solemn procession along the river to Whitehall and thence to the City.
1854 Birth of Jenny, Lady Randolph Churchill, wife of Lord Randolph and mother of Winston.
1854 The first free lending Library opened, on Marylebone Road, London.
1888 The London Financial Guide was launched. It became The Financial Times on 13th February.
1898 The birth, in Rochdale, Lancashire, of Dame Gracie Fields, internationally famous singer.
1909 Shackleton’s polar expedition was forced to turn back, only 11 miles away from the South Pole.
1929 Alexander Fleming successfully treated his assistant Stuart Craddick’s infection with a penicillin broth, at St Mary’s Hospital, Paddington.
1957 Sir Anthony Eden resigned as prime minister of Britain due to ill health, after just one year and 279 days in the post. He was succeeded by Harold Macmillan.
1972 The Queen Elizabeth, the liner that had been turned into a sailing university, caught fire and sank in Hong Kong harbour. She had been the world’s largest passenger liner for over thirty years.
1972 British miners began their first strike since 1926. They were campaigning for improved pay and conditions. A season of power cuts followed.
1997 The lone yachtsman, Tony Bullimore, feared drowned after his boat, (Exide Challenger) capsized in the Southern Ocean five days previously, was found safe and well.
1998 Northern Ireland Secretary Dr. Mo Mowlam made a controversial visit to the Maze Prison in Belfast, Northern Ireland to talk to Loyalist and Republican terrorists.
Graham

Posted By: journeyman

10th January

1645 Execution of William Laud, the archbishop of Canterbury. He was beheaded on Tower Hill after being found ‘guilty of endeavouring to subvert the laws, to overthrow the Protestant religion, and to act as an enemy to Parliament’. The next archbishop was not appointed until fifteen years later, with the Restoration of Charles II.
1839 Indian tea was auctioned in Britain for the first time. Previously, only China tea had been available, at great expense. After the introduction of Indian tea, prices fell and tea became so affordable that it was soon the national drink.
1840 Sir Rowland Hill introduced the Penny Post to Britain. Mail was delivered at a standard charge rather than being paid by the recipient. On its first day, 112,000 letters were posted in London alone.
1863 The first section of the London Underground railway was opened by Prime Minister Gladstone. It ran from Paddington to Farringdon Street stopping at seven stations. The trains ran every fifteen minutes.
1918 The House of Lords gave its approval to the Representation of the People Bill, which gave woman over the age of 30 the right to vote.
1922 Arthur Griffith, the founder of Sinn Fein and one of the architects of the 1921 peace treaty with Britain, was elected president of the newly established Irish Free State
1928 Hood and Moncrieff, English pioneers of aviation, were lost over the Tasman Sea as they attempted to fly from Australia to New Zealand.
1946 The first General Assembly of the United Nations met at Westminster Central Hall.
1979 'Crisis? What Crisis?' The Prime Minister, James Callaghan, flew back into strike-torn Britain denying allegations that the country was in chaos.
1985 The C5 electric car with a top speed of 15 mph was demonstrated by its inventor, Sir Clive Sinclair. It was battery-driven car and sold for £399 but flopped.
1985 Eight people died and dozens were injured when an explosion destroyed a block of exclusive flats in south-west London.
1992 An IRA bomb exploded in Whitehall, London, 1000 ft. from Downing Street.
Graham

Posted By: journeyman

11th January
1569 The first state lottery in England. Lots were sold at the West Door of St Paul’s Cathedral. National lotteries continued until 1826 when it was felt that " the inducement to gambling held out by lotteries is a great moral evil, helping to impoverish many and diverting attention from the more legitimate industrial modes of moneymaking"
1815 Birth, in Glasgow, of Sir John Alexander Macdonald, the first Prime Minister of Canada.
1857 Birth of jockey Fred Archer. He won 2749 races, including five Derby winners.
1859 Birth of George Nathaniel Curzon (Lord Curzon of Kedleston), Viceroy of India. He had hopes of becoming Prime Minister, but Baldwin was chosen in his place. The love of his life was Elinor Glyn, the romantic novelist.
1922 Birth of Neville Duke, English test pilot. He took the World Air Speed Record on 7th September 1953 in a Hawker Hunter MK 3, achieving 727.6 mph over a 3 km course.
1928 Thomas Hardy, the English playwright and poet, died aged 87.
1954 All Comet airliners were grounded. The day before, 35 people had died in a mysterious crash off the island of Elba. In 1953, another Comet had crashed inexplicably near Calcutta when 'it fell out of the sky for no apparent reason’. The cause was finally traced to a structural fault, with serious consequences for British aviation.
1973 The first 867 graduates from the Open University were awarded their degrees after two years studying from home.
1980 Nigel Short, age 14, from Bolton, Lancashire, became the youngest International Master in the history of chess.
1984 French farmers hijacked British lorries in a dispute against meat imports.
1993 British Airways was forced into an embarrassing climb-down in relation to a campaign of 'dirty tricks' it launched against rival airline Virgin Atlantic. BA was forced to pay damages to both Virgin Atlantic and its boss Richard Branson.
1994 The Duchess of Kent announced that she was converting to Catholicism, the first member of the Royal Family to become a Roman Catholic since James II in the 17th century.
Graham

Posted By: journeyman

12th January
1866 The Aeronautical Society of Great Britain was formed in London, fourteen years after the Société Aérostatique de France, (the first such organization), and thirty-seven years before the Wright Brothers achieved the first successful powered flight.
1895 The National Trust was founded by three Victorian philanthropists - Miss Octavia Hill, Sir Robert Hunter and Canon Hardwicke Rawnsley.
1950 The British submarine Truculent collided with a Swedish ship in the Thames, resulting in its sinking, and the deaths of 65 people.
1954 The Queen opened New Zealand’s parliament, the first time in that country’s history that a reigning monarch had done so.
1959 Henry Cooper defeated Brian London on points over 15 rounds, becoming British and European heavyweight boxing champion.
1963 The Beatles released their first top ten single - Please Please Me.
1966 Three visiting MPs were attacked by 400 supporters of Rhodesian Prime Minister Ian Smith at a rowdy meeting in Salisbury, the capital of Rhodesia.
1971 Two bombs exploded at the home of Employment Secretary Robert Carr, in outer London. He was unhurt. The bombs had been planted by the Angry Brigade, protesting against a new controversial industrial relations bill Mr Carr was proposing.
1976 Crime writer Dame Agatha Christie died, leaving a rumoured multi-million pound fortune and a final book waiting to be published.
1978 The executors of Lady Churchill’s estate admitted she had burnt Graham Sutherland’s portrait of Sir Winston 18 months after the House of Commons had presented it to him in 1954. Sir Winston ironically described it as ‘a remarkable example of modern art’.
1982 Mark Thatcher, son of Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, went missing in the Sahara while taking part in the Paris-Dakar Rally. After he was rescued, it turned out that he had lost his way. The incident provoked a tidal wave of jokes and cartoons making fun of his sense of direction.
2001 The first foreign coach of the England football team, Sven Goran Eriksson, started his new job.
Graham

Posted By: journeyman

13th January

1691 George Fox, English founder of the religious group of the Society of Friends, (the Quakers), died.
1832 Thomas Lord, founder of Lord's Cricket Ground in 1787, died.
1874 A British army doctor reached the British sentry post at Jalalabad, Afghanistan, the only survivor of a 16,000 strong Anglo-Indian expeditionary force that was massacred during its retreat from Kabul.
1893 The birth of a new political party in Britain as James Keir Hardie united socialists under the banner of the Labour Representation Committee. It dominated the Labour Party until 1914. The last Independent Labour Party MP joined the Labour Party in 1948.
1908 Henry Farman, son of an English newspaper correspondent, won the Deutsch-Archdeacon prize for the first heavier than air aircraft flight to cover a circuit of at least 1 Km.
1921 Mills Munitions of Birmingham registered the patent for windscreen wipers.
1926 Birth of Michael Bond, English children’s writer and creator of ‘Paddington Bear’.
1958 In Scotland, the serial killer Peter Manuel was arrested after a series of attacks over a two year period that left nine people dead.
1964 Capital Records grudgingly released the first Beatles record, ‘I Wanna Hold Your Hand’, in the US ‘to see how it goes’. It became their fastest selling single ever. Within only three weeks, a million copies had been sold.
1993 American, British and French planes bombed a series of targets over southern Iraq. The action was taken in response to repeated Iraqi breaches of the 'no fly zone' implemented after the end of the Gulf War in 1991.
1995 In response to British animal rights protesters, the British Meat and Livestock Commission announced that calves exported from Britain to the Netherlands would be housed in spacious group pens rather than be confined in so called veal crates.
2004 Harold Shipman, who is believed to have killed more than 200 patients, was found hanged in his prison cell.
Graham

Posted By: journeyman

14th January
1742 Sir Edmund Halley, the British Astronomer Royal who gave his name to a comet, died aged 86.
1878 Queen Victoria watched a demonstration of Alexander Graham Bell’s telephone, by W.H. Preece at Osborne House on the Isle of Wight.
1886 Birth of Hugh Lofting, creator of ‘Dr Dolittle’.
1896 The first public screening of a film in Britain, at the London headquarters of the Royal Photographic society.
1898 Lewis Carroll, English author of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, died.
1904 Birth of Sir Cecil Beaton, photographer, writer and theatrical designer.
1937 The first Gallup Opinion Poll was conducted in Britain. It was the invention of George Horace Gallup who founded the Gallup Institute in 1935.
1943 World War II: Prime Minister Winston Churchill and U.S. President Franklin Roosevelt met in Casablanca, Morocco, to discuss their strategy for the next phase of the war.
1947 The Covent Garden Opera Company opened with Karl Rankl’s production of Carmen, in the newly renovated theatre which had been a dance hall during the war.
1969 Football legend Sir Matt Busby announced that he would retire as manager of Manchester United at the end of the season.
1975 A 17-year-old heiress, Lesley Whittle, was kidnapped from her home in Shropshire. Her body was found on 7th March, 1975, hanging from a wire at the bottom of a drain shaft in Bathpool Park, Staffordshire. Donald Neilson, also known as the Black Panther, was convicted of her murder (and three others) in July 1976.
1989 Muslims in Bradford ritually burned a copy of Salman Rushdie’s The Satanic Verses in the first serious protest in Britain. The book had been banned in some Muslim countries.
2002 After three months of no cases being reported, the United Kingdom was finally declared free from the 'Foot and Mouth' infection, after a crisis that started in 2001 in which millions of cows and sheep were destroyed.
Graham

Posted By: Balconia

Keep 'em coming Journeyman. I have been looking for your updates everyday - Most interesting.

Posted By: journeyman

15th January
1535 Henry VIII assumed the title 'Supreme Head of the Church'.
1559 Elizabeth I was crowned Queen of England at the age of 26. She was the daughter of Henry VIII's second wife, Anne Boleyn.
1759 The opening of the British Museum, at Montague House, London. Access often depended on who you were and who you knew. Permission had to be given by the librarian and only 10 people an hour were allowed in.
1797 The first top hat was worn by John Hetherington, a London haberdasher. He was fined £50 the first time he wore his new creation, 'for causing a disturbance'.
1790 Fletcher Christian, eight fellow mutineers from the Bounty, six Tahitian men, and 12 women, landed on the remote Pacific island of Pitcairn.
1859 The National Portrait Gallery opened to the public in Great George Street. There were only 56 portraits and viewing was by appointment on Wednesdays and Saturdays.
1867 Crowds flocked onto the frozen surface of the lake in London’s Regent's Park during a severe frost. The ice broke, and 40 people died.
1870 Britain's first woman doctor, Elizabeth Garrett Anderson, passed the final exam of the Medical Faculty of the Sorbonne and became a fully qualified MD.
1880 The London Telephone Company published the first directory, listing 255 subscribers.
1927 BBC radio broadcast the first live commentary of a rugby match. Captain Teddy Wakelam narrated the match at Twickenham between Wales and England. The following Saturday Wakelam provided the first football commentary from Highbury, where Arsenal was playing Sheffield United.
1962 The centigrade, or Celsius, scale was used in the British Meteorological Office weather forecasts for the first time, more than 200 years after the death of the Swedish scientist who invented it.
1997 Princess Diana, the Princess of Wales, angered government ministers after calling for an international ban on landmines.
Graham

Posted By: journeyman

16th January
1572 Thomas Howard, the Fourth Duke of Norfolk, was tried for treason for his part in the Ridolfi plot to restore Catholicism in England. He was later executed at the Tower of London.
1604 At the Hampton Court Conference, John Rainolds presented to King James I the motion '...that there might bee a newe translation of the Bible.' Approved the next day, Rainolds' motion led to the 1611 publication of the King James Bible.
1707 The Act of Union was passed, merging the English and Scottish parliaments and paving the way for the new country of Great Britain.
1769 One of the worst riots in theatre history occurred at the Haymarket Theatre, London. Crowds had packed out the venue to see a conjuror who claimed he would get into a quart tavern bottle. The conjuror never arrived, and the crowd erupted.
1908 The first issue of Scouting for Boys, the journal of the Scouting movement.
1909 Ernest Shackleton’s British expedition reached the area of the South Magnetic Pole.
1924 The BBC broadcast Danger by Richard Hughes, the first play written for radio.
1928 The funeral of Thomas Hardy. His heart was buried in the village cemetery in Stinsford, Dorset, and his ashes in Westminster Abbey.
1950 Listen With Mother began on radio with the words "Hello children. Are you sitting comfortably? Then I'll begin". When the series ended in 1982 there was a national outcry
1957 The Cavern Club opened in Liverpool. It provided a showcase for many young rock ‘n’ roll musicians, among them the Beatles.
1981 The Northern Ireland civil rights campaigner and former Westminster MP, Bernadette McAliskey, and her husband, were shot by gunmen at their home in County Tyrone.
1982 Britain and the Vatican resumed full diplomatic relations after a break of exactly 447 years.
1991 Operation 'Desert Storm' began against Iraq, for its invasion of
Graham

Posted By: journeyman

17th January
1746 ‘Bonnie Prince Charlie’ and his Highlanders won the battle of Falkirk. It was to be their last victory in the 'forty-five' Jacobite uprising, as three months later they were defeated at Culloden.
1773 Captain Cook's ship 'Resolution' became the first to cross the Antarctic Circle.
1820 Birth of poet and novelist Anne Brontë. She was the youngest of six children of Patrick and Maria Brontë. The Brontë Museum is in the former parsonage at Haworth, West Yorkshire.
1863 The birth, in Manchester, of David Lloyd George, Welsh politician. In 1909 he introduced old-age pensions, followed in 1911 by health and unemployment insurance. In 1916 he became Prime Minister of a coalition government. After the First World War he was re-elected with a huge majority, and held office until 1922.
1896 The Daimler Motor Company (Coventry) was registered as the first British car manufacturer.
1907 Alfred Wainwright, whose books for walkers did much to popularise the Lake District, was born, in Blackburn, Lancashire. In 1952, he began the task of walking every fell in Lakeland and recording his walks with pen and ink drawings. It took him 13 years to climb the 214 fells, travelling on foot or by public transport from his Kendal home, as he never learnt to drive. His ashes are scattered on Haystacks, Cumbria. Click here for a picture of Haystacks.
1912 Captain Robert Falcon Scott reached the South Pole, only to find that the Norwegian Roald Amundsen had beaten him by one month.
1933 A telegram was received by the MCC at Lords Cricket Ground from the Australian Cricket Board: ‘Bodyline bowling has assumed such proportions as to menace the best interests of the game, making protection of his body by a batsman his main consideration. In our opinion it is unsportsmanlike. Unless it is stopped at once it is likely to upset the friendly relations existing between Australia and England.’ Jardine was captaining England at Adelaide and the bodyline bowler was Larwood.
1968 The motor manufacturer British Leyland was formed; from the merger of British Motor Holdings Ltd. and Leyland Motor Corp. Ltd.
1986 The Royal yacht Britannia evacuated Britons and other foreign nationals from Aden during their civil war.
Graham

Posted By: journeyman

18th January
1486 After 30 years of civil war the Royal Houses of Lancaster and York were united by the marriage of Henry VII to the eldest daughter of Edward IV.
1778 English navigator Captain James Cook became the first European to visit the Hawaiian Islands. He named them the Sandwich Islands, after Lord Sandwich, who was then first Lord of the Admiralty.
1779 Birth of Peter Mark Roget, English doctor and lexicographer, who produced his Roget's Thesaurus in 1852 after 47 years’ work.
1788 A British fleet of eleven ships and 800 convicts landed at Botany Bay, Australia. They created the first British penal colony, in Port Jackson - Sydney.
1848 Birth of Matthew Webb (Captain Webb), the first person to swim the English Channel.
1879 England beat Wales 2-1 in their first international football match, played at the Oval, Kennington, London.
1879 The first edition of Boy’s Own Paper was published. The editor was S.O. Beeton, the husband of Mrs. Beeton, the cookery book writer.
1888 Birth of Sir Thomas Sopwith, British aviation pioneer. It was a Sopwith Camel that shot down Von Richthofen, the Red Baron. On Sopwith’s 100th birthday, a Sopwith Pup built after World War I, led a fly-past over his home in Hampshire.
1919 Bentley Motors was established in London, but the manufacturer did not make a complete car for 27 years, only engines and chassis.
1934 The first arrest was made in Britain as a result of issuing pocket radios to police. A Brighton shoplifter was arrested just 15 minutes after stealing three coats.
1958 Bunty was launched by D C Thompson, the Dundee and Manchester based publishers. It was the first comic aimed at a young female readership and was an instant success.
1976 British Labour MPs Jim Sillars and John Robertson launched the Scottish Labour Party (SLP) to campaign for greater devolution for Scotland.
Graham

Posted By: journeyman

19th January

1544 Francis II, King of France and husband of Mary, Queen of Scots, was born.
1547 Henry Howard, Earl of Surrey, courtier, poet and soldier, was beheaded at the Tower of London, for high treason.
1649 The Puritan parliament began the trial of Charles I for treason. Charles refused to plead, saying that he did not recognise the legality of the High Court.
1736 Birth of James Watt, the Scottish inventor who developed the steam engine and gave his name to a unit of power.
1746 Bonnie Prince Charlie's troops occupied Stirling.
1813 Sir Henry Bessemer, who gave his name to a process for converting cast iron into steel, was born, in Charlton - Hertfordshire.
1915 More than 20 people were killed when German zeppelins bombed England for the first time. The bombs were dropped on Great Yarmouth and King's Lynn.
1937 The first play written for British television, The Underground Murder Mystery by J. Bissell Thomas, was broadcast by the BBC.
1937 The 18 year old English ballet dancer Margot Fonteyn made her debut in 'Giselle' at Sadler's Wells in London.
1973 The Statesman, an unarmed ocean going tug, was sent to protect British trawlers from Icelandic patrol boats as the dispute over cod fishing rights intensified.
1988 Christopher Nolan, a 22-year-old Irish writer, won the £20,000 Whitbread Book of the Year Award for his autobiography, Under the Eye of the Clock. Completely paralysed, Nolan used a ‘unicorn’ attachment on his forehead to write the novel at a painfully slow speed.
1990 Police in Johannesburg, armed with batons and dogs, broke up a demonstration against English cricketers who had defied a ban on playing in segregated South Africa.
2004 Prime Minister Tony Blair said that he would survive his toughest week as he faced the Hutton report and the top-up fees vote and ........ he was right!
Graham

Posted By: journeyman

20th January
1265 England's first Parliament met at Westminster Hall in London, convened by the Earl of Leicester, Simon de Montfort.
1568 The death of Miles Coverdale, aged 80, translator and publisher of the first complete Bible to be printed in English (1535).
1841 The British occupied Hong Kong. China ceded it to Britain, and the Treaty of Nanking confirmed it a year later.
1850 The opening of the Penny Savings Bank, to encourage thrift amongst the poor.
1882 A draper’s shop called Coxon & Company, in Newcastle-upon-Tyne, became the first shop in the world to be lit by incandescent electric light. It used Swan lamps.
1936 George V died and was succeeded by Edward VIII who abdicated 325 days later because of his insistence in marrying American divorcee Wallis Simpson.
1958 Members of the British and New Zealand teams attempting the first surface crossing of the Antarctic joined up at the South Pole.
1961 Arthur M. Ramsay became the 100th Archbishop of Canterbury.
1986 Mrs Pauline Williams of Luton won her three year fight to prosecute the man who injected her drug addict son with a fatal painkiller. She was the first person to bring a private prosecution for manslaughter to a Crown Court trial.
1986 France and Britain finally decided to undertake the Channel Tunnel project, promising that trains would run under the Channel by 1993.
1987 The Archbishop of Canterbury's special envoy to Lebanon, Terry Waite, was kidnapped in Beirut whilst attempting to win freedom for Western hostages.
1997 Her Majesty's Royal Yacht Britannia began her final voyage, to Hong Kong, before being decommissioned.
1997 Three sisters, Phoebe, Faith and Alice Julian were among 17 girls who were the first to be admitted to the choir of York Minster, ending a 400 year old tradition of men only.
Graham

Posted By: journeyman

21st January
1549 Parliament passed the first of four Acts of Uniformity, the first requiring the exclusive use of the Book of Common Prayer in all public services of the Anglican Church.
1799 Edward Jenner's smallpox vaccination was introduced.
1846 The publication of the first edition of the Daily News, edited by Charles Dickens. It merged with the Daily Chronicle to form the News Chronicle in 1930, and was ultimately absorbed by the Daily Mail in 1960.
1907 Taxi cabs were officially recognized in Britain.
1925 Birth of the comedian Benny Hill, in Southampton, Hampshire.
1937 Marcel Boulestin became the first television cook when he presented the first of the Cook’s Night Out programmes on BBC.
1941 The British communist newspaper, the Daily Worker, was suppressed in wartime London.
1950 The British writer George Orwell died after a three year battle against tuberculosis. His books included 1984 and Animal Farm. His books were controversial and 1984, like Animal Farm, was widely viewed as an attack on the Communist system.
1966 The Monte Carlo rally ended in uproar over the disqualification of the British cars expected to fill the first four places. They were all ruled out of the prizes, along with six other British cars, for alleged infringements of regulations about the way their headlights dipped.
1976 The first Concorde jets carrying commercial passengers simultaneously took off, at 11:40 a.m. from London's Heathrow Airport and Orly Airport outside Paris. The London flight was to Bahrain in the Persian Gulf, and the Paris flight was to Rio de Janeiro. Nearly 3 hours was knocked off the normal flying time to Bahrain by the British Concorde but the Air France Concorde arrived 38 minutes late.
1997 More than 80 people were named as child abusers in statements to a North Wales inquiry into claims of abuse of children in care in Clwyd and Gwynedd over 20 years
Graham.

Posted By: journeyman

22nd January
1561 The birth of Francis Bacon, Viscount St. Albans. He was a statesman, a lawyer, a philosopher, an essayist, and Lord Chancellor of England. Some even claim that he was the real author of Shakespeare’s works.
1719 William Paterson, Scottish financier and founder of the Bank of England, died.
1771 The Falkland Islands were given to Britain, by the Spanish.
1788 Birth, in London, of the poet George Gordon Byron, better known as Lord Byron.
1879 The Zulus massacred British troops at Isandlwana. Two British officers and eighty men of the 24th regiment fought off attacks of more than 4,000 Zulu warriors and eleven Victoria Crosses were awarded.
1901 Queen Victoria died, aged 81, at Osborne House on the Isle of Wight. Spanning 63 years, her reign, the longest in British history, saw the growth of 'an empire on which the sun never set'.
1902 Marconi carried out his first radio transmission experiments, transmitting from the Lizard, Cornwall, across the water to St. Catherine’s on the Isle of Wight.
1924 Stanley Baldwin resigned as British Prime Minister at the end of an unsuccessful election, and the new Labour Party had their first Prime Minister, Ramsay MacDonald.
1947 In wartime Britain the fresh meat ration was reduced to 1s (5p) per week.
1955 Joe Davis recorded the first official maximum snooker break of 147.
1962 The ‘A6 Murder’ trial began, the longest murder trial in British legal history. James Hanratty was accused of murdering Michael Gregston at a lay-by near Bedford. The trial finally ended on 17 February 1962 with Hanratty sentenced to hang, despite his protests of innocence and disquiet amongst some observers of the trial.
1972 The United Kingdom, the Irish Republic, and Denmark joined the Common Market.
1992 Rebecca Ridgway became the first woman to row around Cape Horn in a canoe. The expedition began on January 8th in Chile and the 200 mile expedition, through the Beagle Channel to Cape Horn Island, was directed by her father, ex -transatlantic rower John Ridgway.
Graham

Posted By: journeyman

23rd January
1571 Queen Elizabeth I opened the Royal Exchange, London, founded by the financier Sir Thomas Gresham as a bankers’ meeting house.
1643 Sir Thomas Fairfax took Leeds for the Parliamentarians during the English Civil War.
1713 The signing of the Treaty of Utrecht redrew the map of Europe. The treaty signalled the end of the long and bloody War of Spanish Succession. As part of the agreement Gibraltar and Minorca become British.
1806 Death of William Pitt ‘The Younger’ at the age of 46. He was Britain's youngest Prime Minister and served twice, from 19th December 1783 to 14th March 1801 and again from 10th May 1804 until his death 'on this day'.
1849 English-born Elizabeth Blackwell, who was constantly ostracized and harassed by the male students, graduated from a New York medical school to become the first woman doctor.
1875 Charles Kingsley, the English clergyman who wrote The Water Babies, died.
1931 The official opening of Whipsnade Zoo near Dunstable.
1943 The British captured Tripoli. The Germans retreated, and the Eighth Army crossed into Tunisia in pursuit.
1955 Fourteen people died and dozens were injured when an express train travelling from York to Bristol derailed at Sutton Coldfield station.
1963 At 7.30 pm in Beirut, the American Eleanor Philby was waiting for her husband Kim, a Middle East correspondent for two London journals, to collect her. Instead, he was on his way to Moscow - ‘the most damaging double agent in British history’.
1985 PC George Hammond was viciously stabbed while on the beat in London, and it took 120 pints of blood to save his life. He never fully recovered, and two years later he committed suicide.
1985 A House of Lords debate was televised for the first time
1989 Legislation came into force which permitted garages to display fuel prices by litre only, not by the gallon.
Graham

Posted By: journeyman

24th January

76 The birth, in Spain, of Hadrian (Publius Aelius Hadrianus), Roman Emperor whose defensive policies led to the building of Hadrian’s Wall on the border between Scotland and England.
1236 The marriage of Henry III of England to Eleanor of Provence.
1749 The birth of Charles James Fox, the British Whig whom Sir George Macaulay Trevelyan described as ‘Our first great statesman of the modern school’. He was a great orator, and as Foreign Minister he persuaded Prime Minister Pitt to abolish slavery.
1900 General Sir Charles Warren led 2,000 British troops to capture Spion Kop, South Africa, which was defended by just 500 Boers. The British lost 1,200 troops, the Boers 300.
1908 The first part of Robert Baden-Powell's 'Scouting for Boys' was published.
1915 The First World War sea battle of Dogger Bank ended with a British victory as the superior speed and gunnery of the British fleet sank the German armoured cruiser Blucher.
1916 World War I: Britain introduced Conscription - the automatic call-up of all those eligible to join the Armed Services.
1965 Death of Sir Winston Churchill, aged 90. He was First Lord of the Admiralty at the time of the battle of Dogger Bank (see above). He had correctly predicted that he would die on the same date as his father, Lord Randolph Churchill, who had died exactly 70 years before.
1969 Students protesting at the installation of steel security gates at the London School of Economics went on the rampage, with crowbars, pickaxes and sledgehammers.
1976 Margaret Thatcher, leader of the Conservative Party, was dubbed 'The Iron Lady' in the Soviet newspaper 'Red Star' after her speech on the threat of Communism.
1986 The beginning of the end for London's Fleet Street, home to most of Britain's national newspapers, when staff of the 'Sun' and 'News of the World' were told that they were moving to new premises at Wapping, in London's Docklands.
2001 Northern Ireland Secretary Peter Mandelson resigned from the Cabinet over a passports for cash scandal. It was the second time he had left the Cabinet in disgrace since Labour came to power in 1997.
Graham

Posted By: journeyman

25th January
1327 Edward III acceded to the English throne.
1533 The Bishop of Lichfield secretly married King Henry VIII to Anne Boleyn, the second of Henry's six wives. She had, ten days before, discovered that she was pregnant.
1554 Sir Thomas Wyatt gathered an army of 4000 men in Kent at the start of his rebellion against Queen Mary. His fellow conspirators were timid and inept and he eventually surrendered. He was executed and his body 'quartered' on 11th April.
1627 Birth of the Honourable Robert Boyle, one of the pioneers of modern chemistry and physics.
1759 Birth of Robert Burns, Scotland’s national poet. His birthday is celebrated as ‘Burns Night’ by Scotsmen all over the world.
1855 Death of the writer Dorothy Wordsworth, sister of the romantic poet William Wordsworth.
1858 Mendelssohn's Wedding March was first played .... at the wedding of Queen Victoria's daughter Princess Victoria and crown prince Frederick of Prussia.
1874 Birth of William Somerset Maugham, English novelist and short story writer.
1899 The Wireless Telegraph & Signal Company began manufacture of the first radio sets, at Chelmsford.
1911 The Daily Herald was launched. It was the first newspaper to sell two million copies.
1919 Founding of The League of Nations, forerunner of the United Nations.
1972 The world's first kidney and pancreatic tissue transplant was carried out in London
1981 ‘The Gang of Four’ (Roy Jenkins, Dr. David Owen, Shirley Williams and Bill Rodgers) split from the British Labour party to form the Social Democrats.
1989 Actor John Cleese won damages for libel at the High Court over an article in the Daily Mirror, which claimed he had become like Basil Fawlty in his comedy series Fawlty Towers.
Graham
I will be off the forum for a while folks due to moving house in the UK. I have posted the link for you to check your daily updates, I hope to be back on line soon.

http://www.beautifulbritain.co.uk/htm/onthisday/onthisday.htm


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